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Choko

vl_choko.jpg Nutritional Information:
A member of the gourd family, Choko is low energy with just 85kJ per 100g (2/3 cup). 1/2 cup cooked choko is a serve, and is:
 a source of vitamin C.

Varieties:
 Common
 White

Availability:
 Common - all year
 white - March to April

Selection:
Choose firm, small and fresh green chokos that are free of brown spots or signs of sprouting.

Storage:
Store choko carefully as it can bruise easily. Store whole, unwrapped, in the crisper of the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

Preparation Information:
 Steam
 Boil
 Microwave
 Soup
 Casserole
 Bake
 Poach

Cut the vegetable into segments, removing the seed core. Halve and stuff with meat, rice or other vegetables. Choko can also be sliced and added to soups and casseroles. Also known as vegetable pear, the versatile choko can even be baked or poached with fruits to make a dessert.

Historical Information:
The choko vine that hangs off the traditional Aussie paling fence is actually native to Central America, Mexico and the West Indies. The Aztecs called it chayote and Francisco Hernandez, an early Spanish historian who lived in Mexico during the mid 16th century, recorded that the natives commonly included it in their diet. After the Spanish conquest the choko was taken to all tropical areas of the world. Early white settlers introduced choko to Australia.

Recipes: