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Swede

vl_turnipsswedes.jpg Nutritional Information:
1/2 cup cooked swede is a serve, and is a:
 Good source of vitamin C and fibre.
 Source of folate and potassium.
Despite their filling nature, they are low in kilojoules, with only 85kJ per 100g (2/3 cup).





Turnips and Swedes

Availability:
May to October

Selection:
Select swedes that feel heavy for their size and present themselves with firm, clean outer skins.

Storage:
Trim and store in an airtight plastic bag in the refrigerator crisper for a couple of weeks.

Preparation Information:
 Boil
 Bake
 Mash
 Microwave
 Roast
 Stir fry
 Soup
 Stew
 Casserole

Wash then peel thoroughly to remove the thick outer skin. Swede can be prepared and served in any of the methods used for potatoes. Swede can be added to soups, stews and casseroles. Mashed swede added to mashed potato gives it a slightly sweet taste. Swede can also be made into fritters and pancakes.

Historical Information:
Americans know it as "rutabaga". The Scottish call it "neeps" and serve it with haggis. The swede, a fairly recent root vegetable, is thought to have originated around the 17th century in Bohemia. In 1620 a Swiss botanist described the root vegetable, believed to be a hybrid of the cabbage and the turnip. By 1664 it was growing in England.

Popular in colder European countries, the Swede enjoyed staple status during World War II. A hardy, ruddy vegetable similar in texture to turnip, swede is readily available in many Australian greengroceries today.

Recipes: